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Turning the World Upside Down

As the weeks have progressed, hopefully we can each see that we all have a role to play - even if it’s scope initially feels dwarfed. Resource constraints can bring both creativity and innovation; how many organisations have responded to COVID-19, with pace? Delivering solutions in weeks that previously would have taken months or years, proving it can be done.
 
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The future world of work has changed. This change has been aggressive and due to a virus, and not (as has been talked about for years) as a result of AI. How we feel about the way we work and how we interact with organisations has radically changed, forever.

Its key workers who have kept us safe, fed and watered. For a long time now, after being a Chair of Governors for a pre-school some years ago, I've felt that many roles that have significant responsibility and help to shape the lives of future generations are not rewarded accordingly. You could argue similarly for all the key workers in the country. What impact will this have on how the economy and world of work regards and rewards these roles going forward? Will it create a future wave of nurses, doctors, teachers, signallers, transport specialists etc. in children who lived and were educated throughout the COVID-19 pandemic?
 
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My previous (limited) view of AI was that, despite what it could offer, there would always need to be a human being at the end. I think the current situation also proves this. It has been amazing how, without the technology that exists and people adapting to it, learning new skills (individually and as teams and companies) we would not have been able to adjust and adapt as quickly as we did. However, there's a word of caution in this quote from People Management Magazine's article The New Normal which I love: 

“Just because we are using technology doesn’t mean we use each other as tools. Organisations are not machines -  they are communities.”

In the weeks since lockdown began, I've personally seen organisations demonstrate a “human” side which has always been the ethos of my own business. How a business chooses to be with their employees going forward will be key. How an organisation values their people, and treats them accordingly, will be the differentiator.

Realise and reflect on how you've adapted, created and innovated over recent weeks;
Aspire to further develop a sense of community; pulling together; one big team; rowing in the same direction, and;
Do use the shift in our daily experience as an opportunity to do things differently!

Remember the old adage “if you do what you have always done, you will get what you have always got”. The country has proven in the past few weeks that it doesn’t follow this adage - let’s keep it that way!

Blog Posts

  • thumb_sunrise-1756274_1920.jpg
    The future world of work has changed. This change has been aggressive and due to a virus, and not (as has been talked about for years) as a result of AI. How we feel about the way we work and how we interact with organisations has radically changed, forever.
  • thumb_puzzle-1487340_1280.jpg
    Personal resilience is the capacity for an individual to remain both flexible and strong in the midst of ambiguity and change.
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    As a coach, you know you can make the biggest impact when your coachee wants to be coached and has made that decision for themselves. The likelihood of successful, sustained behaviour-change is just so much stronger.
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    It's quite amazing what we can realise when we put our mind to it and have an open, growth-based mindset - perhaps even more so in these strange and unprecedented times!
  • thumb_coronavirus-4914026_1920_0.jpg
    It's been a strange few weeks, and I've been reflecting on how I've responded to what's happening in the world, noticing my behaviour, and considering how I've been feeling.