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Reflect, re-evaluate and refocus

Working with some coaching clients at the moment where their focus is on career transition and catching up with people in my network, it is great to see for a significant number of people - a "new year; new role".  It got me thinking that for a lot of people, last year could have made them reflect about what they do now?  Is their current role aligned to their values?  Or they may simply be saying each day "what on earth am I doing?" 
 

If this is the case then I thought it might be helpful to share some guidelines and things for you to consider to support a focused approach to finding your next appropriate opportunity that will play to your strengths and energise you. Take a look at the Odin Development Compass HERE. Also to consider what questions to ask through an interview process to help you make that informed decision and also know how any future employer will on-board/induct you in the current climate.  How aligned will your expectations of what you want the company to do, actually be with what the company will do??  Something that is vitally important to make that seamless transition, however, I know perhaps is not given enough attention.  Unfortunately, I was made aware by a client last year, how someone they had invested time in recruiting and on-boarding, suddenly left very quickly after joining.

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From you the individual, the hiring manager and team/company perspective there is a lot of time invested in recruiting and identifying talent.  I hope the following tips will be useful.

For you the individual:

1. Look back on your career and when you were at your best - playing to your strengths and feeling energised.  What were you doing?  What was it about these roles?  Was it the work itself and what specifically?  Was it the team you were a part of?  Was it the culture of the organisation?

2. Then articulate the values that drive you and that you if you don't live by, you cannot be "you!"  This exercise may be less than easy and need some soul searching, however, if you are truly honest with yourself these will be the things that are your driving force and going forward should always be front of mind when you are considering any role, opportunity.

3. With the information from point 1 and 2 also consider what's important to you in a future role; what are the things that are a must?  What are the things you would possibly compromise on?

For the individual/hiring manager/company:

Finding your next opportunity/ideal candidate is a two-way process.  You must decide if the company is right for you just as much as a company has to decide if you are right for them.

With this in mind consider the 3 C's (c) LHH:

1. Capability - how aligned are your strengths, skills, knowledge and experience to the role you are applying for.  Most companies will have the most important things needed in a role written first in a job description/ and person specification.

2. Compatability/culture - can you see yourself working there?  Are your values aligned to the values of the company?

3. Chemistry - during any interview process you will hopefully get to meet whoever will be your line manager; can you see yourself working for them; being part of their team? 

Only if you can answer yes to the above three "C's" is the role likely to be right for you.  You then need to, through the interview process demonstrate how you have added value in the past and how you could add value in the future to whatever role/organisation you are meeting with.

Again to ensure you are aligned and also from a hiring manager and company perspective there are certain questions through the interview process you can ask to gain as much of an understanding of culture and "how things are done around here" as possible.  It is for both parties to understand each others' expectations.

Consider the following:

Ask questions that will help you understand the culture of the organisation.  Ask if there have been other new members of the team or to the company and could you get a chance to meet with them.  Ask the question of how they would describe the culture of the organisation.  Ask what has the company done differently since the pandemic?  What is in place to ensure the team is engaged and inspired in an agile world? What is in place to support employees' wellbeing? Be direct and ask about your on-boarding - what will this look like.  In this way you will know every clearly if it will align with your expectations and can then ask other questions if needed.

The key is to be pro-active and not be afraid to ask questions to help make an informed decision.  This applies to individuals and hiring managers.  As I write this blog, I am also thinking that from a company perspective, irrespective of size that inductions/on-boarding also needs to be specific for each new employee and that individual adaptive leadership has to be applied throughout the whole employee life-cycle.  More about this is a future blog!

Realise that more than ever before understanding both parties expectations is key;

Aspire to be informed; you can never ask too many questions; and

Do reflect, re-evaluate and refocus to ensure that seamless transition!

Blog Posts

  • I first met Paul at an The Art of Work Ltd event a few months back and we instantly connected and then realised we had quite a few things in common.  Paul's passion is in delivering mental health awareness to individuals and companies from a heartfelt desire to make a difference.  I am so glad Paul agreed to write a guest blog.  Thank you Paul!

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  • I was on holiday the other week with my family and I was thinking of what we could do to make our “holiday” different from what has become our “normal” working from home (WFH) and virtual schooling.
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  • Sunday morning and it is lovely to not rush up; however, I still reach for my iPhone to read my emails and articles on LinkedIn.  Though perhaps not the best thing to be doing, and reflecting on what is the mental impact on me about doing this??  However, I do read some great articles that give me inspiration and ideas for my blogs.  This morning was no exception!

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    Last week talking to friends and clients about how they were feeling the words that kept coming back to me were "psychological safety". The word "Psychological Safety" may currently be topical, although we have long discussed the "Psychological Contract" within HR and for me the two are very much linked.  Without "the belief that one will not be punished or humiliated for speaking up with ideas, questions, concerns or mistakes", how can any employee or member of staff feel they have a connection to an organisation? 
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    Working with some coaching clients at the moment where their focus is on career transition and catching up with people in my network, it is great to see for a significant number of people - a "new year; new role".  It got me thinking that for a lot of people, last year could have made them reflect about what they do now?  Is their current role aligned to their values?  Or they may simply be saying each day "what on earth am I doing?"